Posted in crochet, events

Fiber Fantasy, April 14-16, 2022

The Albuquerque Fiber Arts Council hosts an event every two years known as the Fiber Arts Fiesta. The fiesta is home to the host guilds’ booths, vendors, artist exhibits, educational displays, guild sponsored classes, and a charity booth. The beneficiary of the 2022 fundraiser is the Roadrunner Foodbank.

Each Fiesta has a theme, and Fiesta 2022 is billed as Fiber Fantasy. The participating guilds were tasked with presenting an educational display pertaining to a color or color scheme. The New Mexico Crochet Guild’s presentation was on Complementary Color combinations. As part of the display, the guild created an art piece of freeform crochet called Fantasy Garden and ran a continuous slideshow. The videos were created by Anna Murphy and narrated by Ronni Sparks.

COLOR THEORY: From Newton to Now
A brief explanation of the Complementary Color Scheme
COMPLEMENTARY COLOR THEMES: Choosing Yarn Colors

After the fiesta is over, I’ll be sure to post a gallery of photos. It has been a lot of work to plan this, but it has been fun and exciting to work with such dedicated volunteers. The Fiber Arts Council’s dedication and committment to the fiber arts community is so inspiring to the 19 guilds it supports.

The crochet guild is hosting a series of mini-classes during the event called the Crochet Cafe. Each session runs 15-20 minutes and is designed to give students a taste of crochet’s different techniques. Classes range from making simple stitches to keeping your edges square to simple Tunisian and more. Check out the Crochet Cafe.

The New Mexico Crochet Guild’s classes at the Fiber Arts Fiesta. Click the photo, then scroll down to see the class offerings.

Posted in crochet, Finished Objects

April in Paris Capelet pattern release

After much rewriting and testing, the April in Paris capelet pattern is finally available. I’ve listed it on Etsy since I’m not set up to sell on this blog. Many thanks to Melissa for her help in finalizing the pattern. This lovely yarn is hand dyed from The Little Weasel shop in Paris.

This yarn is Malabrigo “Sock”, and it has a lot more stretch to it than the Little Weasel yarn. I had to modify the neckline, but you don’t see that in this photo. I suggest when looking for yarn, choose one that is not very stretchy for best results. The Malabrigo was luscious to work with but didn’t give the same results. I did write in the modifications that I came up with for the neckline. I’m currently working on one in cotton, and I will post the results here. I suspect it will be very stretchy. Might have to go down a hook size.

Continue reading “April in Paris Capelet pattern release”
Posted in Craft tips, crochet, Crochet Technique

Follow up videos and instructions for Fiber Arts Fanatics

The following videos accompany the presentation to the GSNMT for the Fleece to Fashion program. Terms and instructions follow the videos

They are:

Making a slip knot

Holding your yarn like a pro

Chain stitch

Single crochet into the chain

Single crochet rows

Making a Slip Knot
Hold your yarn like a pro
Chain Stitch
Single Crochet into the chain
Single crochet rows

TermsInstructionsAbbreviation
The instructions assume that you are holding your yarn like a pro!
Yarn overPut your hook under the yarn from left to right (inside to ouside), rotate your wrist so that the yarn goes over  the hook.

Alternatively, use your hand to  “throw” the yarn over your hook, from right to left (outside to inside.)
YO
ChainInsert your hook under the yarn from left to right  (yarn over) and grab the yarn with the hook. Holding the loop that is on your hook with your left hand, pull the new yarn through the loop with your right hand.Ch
Single crochetInsert your hook into a stitch (chain or single crochet), yarn over and grab the yarn, then pull the yarn through the stitch. You now have 2 loops on your hook. Yarn over again and pull the yarn through both loops on your hook.Sc
Posted in Book Review, Craft tips, crochet, Crochet Technique

Want to Win the Crochet Jeopardy Game?

All you have to do is ask! So begins Edie Eckman’s best-selling book, The Crochet Answer Book. Subtitled, Solutions to Every Problem You’ll Ever Face, Answers to Every Question You’ll Ever Ask, this little book is one that every crocheter should have in their toolbox.

Every question, I ponder? Nobody says “every” and “all”. That’s hard to live up to. But Edie does a comprehensive and concise job of covering topics from choosing your yarn and hook to finishing. Her catchy chapter titles reel you in: Tense About Gauge; Going in Circles? . . . and Squares and Triangles; A Good Yarn. The Appendix is worth as much as the body of the book. One of my favorite pages there covers common crochet phrases, those sayings that people toss off and you’re left wondering, “What language are they speaking?” Finally, I found it interesting that in her section on reference books, she included this: “Any Japanese stitch dictionary or pattern book you can get your hands on.” My first foray into the world of charted patterns was from a Japanese pattern, so I can relate to her enthusiasm for them.

With cleanly drawn images of both right- and left-handed stitches and techniques, the book is easy to read. The use of wide margins makes it convenient for you to write in your own notes. And its small size – fits right in your hand – means you can keep it in your project bag without difficulty. Then, it is right there when you need it, when you have that question and need an answer. So grab your copy of The Crochet Answer Book today, and you’ll soon be winning the “Crochet Jeopardy” game. I’ll take “Why isn’t my circle round?” for $500, Edie.

Posted in Craft tips, crochet, Works In Progress

No more guilt for crochet UFOs*

*UFO = unfinished objects in your stash

Do you cringe when someone asks you about your unfinished projects? It seems the world is divided into two classes of crocheters: those who work on one project at a time, and finish it before starting another, and those who have multiple projects going at once. The folks in the latter category sometimes are looked at as impetuous and unfocused. “Do you ever finish anything you start?” they are asked. It is even considered a defect of character, like the inability to stick with a project is some sign of discontent or lack of discipline.

A process can be defined as a continuous action, operation, or series of changes taking place in a definite manner.

On the contrary, I have observed that people who are engaged in a variety of projects tend to be more relaxed than their counterparts. To them, their craft is all about the process, not the finished item. Whether it is the feel and color of a new yarn or the excitement of learning a new stitch, each project is an adventure. To these crocheters, it is the action of crocheting that is satisfying. Interestingly, these same people may have three or four books they are reading or multiples of other interests.

The next time someone inquires about your UFOs and WIPs, how will you respond?

  • What business is it of yours?
  • Oh, a few (mumbled.)
  • I’m the proud owner of several exciting and ambitious projects in the works. How about you?