Posted in Craft tips, crochet, Crochet Technique

Follow up videos and instructions for Fiber Arts Fanatics

The following videos accompany the presentation to the GSNMT for the Fleece to Fashion program. Terms and instructions follow the videos

They are:

Making a slip knot

Holding your yarn like a pro

Chain stitch

Single crochet into the chain

Single crochet rows

Making a Slip Knot
Hold your yarn like a pro
Chain Stitch
Single Crochet into the chain
Single crochet rows

TermsInstructionsAbbreviation
The instructions assume that you are holding your yarn like a pro!
Yarn overPut your hook under the yarn from left to right (inside to ouside), rotate your wrist so that the yarn goes over  the hook.

Alternatively, use your hand to  “throw” the yarn over your hook, from right to left (outside to inside.)
YO
ChainInsert your hook under the yarn from left to right  (yarn over) and grab the yarn with the hook. Holding the loop that is on your hook with your left hand, pull the new yarn through the loop with your right hand.Ch
Single crochetInsert your hook into a stitch (chain or single crochet), yarn over and grab the yarn, then pull the yarn through the stitch. You now have 2 loops on your hook. Yarn over again and pull the yarn through both loops on your hook.Sc
Posted in Book Review, Craft tips, crochet, Crochet Technique

Want to Win the Crochet Jeopardy Game?

All you have to do is ask! So begins Edie Eckman’s best-selling book, The Crochet Answer Book. Subtitled, Solutions to Every Problem You’ll Ever Face, Answers to Every Question You’ll Ever Ask, this little book is one that every crocheter should have in their toolbox.

Every question, I ponder? Nobody says “every” and “all”. That’s hard to live up to. But Edie does a comprehensive and concise job of covering topics from choosing your yarn and hook to finishing. Her catchy chapter titles reel you in: Tense About Gauge; Going in Circles? . . . and Squares and Triangles; A Good Yarn. The Appendix is worth as much as the body of the book. One of my favorite pages there covers common crochet phrases, those sayings that people toss off and you’re left wondering, “What language are they speaking?” Finally, I found it interesting that in her section on reference books, she included this: “Any Japanese stitch dictionary or pattern book you can get your hands on.” My first foray into the world of charted patterns was from a Japanese pattern, so I can relate to her enthusiasm for them.

With cleanly drawn images of both right- and left-handed stitches and techniques, the book is easy to read. The use of wide margins makes it convenient for you to write in your own notes. And its small size – fits right in your hand – means you can keep it in your project bag without difficulty. Then, it is right there when you need it, when you have that question and need an answer. So grab your copy of The Crochet Answer Book today, and you’ll soon be winning the “Crochet Jeopardy” game. I’ll take “Why isn’t my circle round?” for $500, Edie.